Robin’s New Arkham City Look Explained

Written by Marcus. Posted in Gaming, Tech News

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Published on July 07, 2022 with 1 Comment


A couple of weeks ago, Best Buy released a free Robin character with the preorder of Arkham City.  Fans were curious about the new look Robin got.  Most people were used to seeing the little boy with a cape, but this new Robin was cut up like a body builder and looked darker than ever.  Arkham City’s senior concept artist, Kan Muftic, came out and said:

“We wanted to create a Robin that players would identify as a contemporary character and move away from the traditional ‘Boy Wonder’ image that most people know.  Our vision of Robin is the one of a troubled young individual that is calm and introverted at times but very dangerous and aggressive if provoked.  The shaved head is inspired by cage fighters, because we thought that Robin might be doing that in his spare time to keep him on his toes.  Still, we kept all the classic trademarks of Robin’s appearance, such as the red and yellow colors of his outfit, the cape and the mask.  We really hope that people will discover our Robin as one of their new favorite characters in the Batman universe. He is back and he means business.”

To me, this makes Robin a lot more likable.  Sort of like the transition of the Batman series to the Christopher Nolan’s movies.  Batman: Arkham City is set for an October release for Playstation 3 and Xbox 360.

[Complex]

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  1. They actually had Robin grow up in the comics. After he dropped the moniker Robin and became Nightwing, his whole story got a lot darker. I don’t know what the developers of this game are talking about, but most of DC is really dark, and has been for over a decade. For a prime example, watch “Batman: Under the Red Hood.” DC has upped their comics for mature audiences, and much of it is definately not for kids.

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